24 Hours in Beantown

Posted by Dave Elliott , September 24, 2015
Boston

In the land of clam chowder, baseball, and the biggest Tea Party in history, Dave Elliott, sales manager for the Drake Hotel, takes us on his list of 'must-dos' to complete from sun-up to sun-down in Beantown.


If you’ve ever fancied yourself to be a tourist, then I might suggest a trip to Boston. I went recently, to play in a volleyball tournament, but what I returned with is a deep love for one of America’s oldest and most historical cities. ‘Beantown’ as it’s referred to, is one of the most friendly, beautiful, and interesting places I’ve ever been lucky enough to visit. It reminded me of Canada, not because of it’s temperate weather, but because of the warmth + genuine interest that radiated from every person I encountered during my time there.

As a Torontonian I feel as though it’s engrained in us to try and find the unmarked paths, the lesser known restaurants, and the sites that once documented to our social media would be the first time they’d be seen by human eyes (we like to think), but Boston is the exception to the rule. A dear friend told me to go to Boston and be a tourist. Don’t try and be cool. Immerse yourself in all of the history and really see the city for what it is – a birthplace for the United States that we know today.

Boston

With only one day to tour the city, I had an ambitious list of ‘must dos’ to complete from sun-up to sun-down. First stop, Fenway Park. One of the last remaining baseball fields used by the Major League, we went here first thing in the morning under a blanket of heavy clouds and light rain. Not alone, we were surrounded by tourist groups who had the same idea – you’ll have to get up pretty early to beat the crowds for any major tourist attraction the city boasts. Even though there was no game scheduled for that day, you could feel the buzz around the area which begged the question “why didn’t we come on game day?!”

At the request of the captain of the ‘Drake ship’, Jeff Stober, we sauntered down the block to a newly opened boutique Hotel called ‘The Verb’. Their idea of boutique is a little different than ours, with 80 rooms to compare to our intimate 19-room property. Barely a wink and a nudge we were off on a private tour of the property showcasing their cozy rooms, private gym and open-air pool (swoon). The tour guide reminded me of home in his delivery, excitement and genuine interest in us (and the property he was touring).

Boston
Boston

From here we hopped on-and-off the Freedom Trail (a self-guided tour of Boston’s landmarks ie. Paul Revere’s house) as we stopped to see the odd (read: annoying) bits I’d elected to visit on my time in Beantown. The flip flop from historic as it’s typically understood, and historic as I understand it was almost comical. From the Boston Common, to the bar where they filmed Cheers, and back to the Granary Burying Ground where Samuel Adams + Paul Revere were laid to rest, and finally ending with Faneuil Hall for a fresh lobster roll and outdoor ping pong.

Boston

If you don’t have the time to dedicate to touring Boston and only have time to stop one place, I’d suggest a local staple in the fashion scene called Bodega. Modeled after a traditional bodega with laundry detergent + paper towel adorning the window displays, the space is actually just a front for what’s hidden from the unsuspecting eye. As you inch closer to the old school Snapple machine to the right of the register, it suddenly slides to the left to allow passage to the real purpose for the storefront. A collection of all urban (and often one of a kind) sneakers, hats, hoodies and accessories showcased by the city’s coolest inhabitants and all set to a soundtrack of local hip hop, I haven’t been able to stop talking about it since I returned to Toronto.

Boston
Boston

If you can go visit Boston in your lifetime, do it. If you can’t stay longer than a day, book another trip. I know I will be!

Posted in: Hotel + Travel